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Qantas accused of sending more call-centre jobs overseas

Qantas accused of sending more call-centre jobs overseas

Australian-based customer service will soon be the preserve of Qantas' premium passengers

Unions have accused Qantas of sending more work offshore after the airline revealed it intends to boost the size of its call centre in Auckland by another 50 jobs.

The airline has informed the Australian Services Union, which represents call-centre workers and other ground staff, of its latest plans for the "consolidation of Australian call centres" from three to one.

Sydney Water protest outside MP's office

Sydney Water protest outside MP's office

Members of the Australian Services Union handed out bottles of water outside the office of Kiama MP Gareth Ward on Saturday, part of an action calling for the state government to rule out privatising Sydney Water.

A dozen union members spent the morning outside Mr Ward's office on Terralong Street, Kiama, in the latest leg of a campaign protesting any moves to sell off the water provider.

ASU NSW assistant secretary Ben Kruse said the union had been unsatisfied with government rhetoric around Sydney Water.

"The concern is the government won't rule out privatisation. Their response was there were 'no plans' to sell it," Mr Kruse said.

"We're calling on Gareth to say what that means. The term 'no plans' is a codeword for 'flog it off at the first opportunity'."

Qantas in job cuts deal with unions

Qantas in job cuts deal with unions

QANTAS management and union leaders have reached a settlement to end the first battle in the industrial war over 5000 job cuts.

Lawyers for the airline and the Australian Services Union told a hearing of the Fair Work Commission in Sydney today that the parties had agreed on a plan which will slow down staff reductions at Sydney airport’s international terminal.

Qantas starts process of shedding jobs as ASU calls for urgent intervention from Fair Work Australia

Qantas starts process of shedding jobs as ASU calls for urgent intervention from Fair Work Australia

Up to 4000 Qantas staff will be given until the end of the month to accept a redundancy package, with unions describing the process as rushed and chaotic.

Australian Services Union NSW branch secretary Sally McManus said Qantas was planning to issue at least 4000 staff with expressions of interest in redundancy on Thursday.

Redundancy process starts: Unions claim offers are "rushed and chaotic".

She said a deadline of March 21 had been set for employees at Sydney International Airport and for the end of the month for other employees.

She said this was "incredibly rushed and chaotic".

"It's an incredibly short time frame," she said.

IBM slashes jobs in 'essential' move

IBM slashes jobs in 'essential' move

IBM has laid off an undisclosed number of workers in Australia and around the world this week as it intensifies its focus on some of the technology industry's hottest markets.

The move is part of a global restructuring plan the company announced in April after releasing disappointing first-quarter results.

The cuts target employees with a range of seniority, from executives to rank-and-file workers, said a person familiar with the effort, who asked not to be identified.

Strike action could lead to increased pollution

Strike action could lead to increased pollution

The Australian Services Union says strike action by Hunter Water employees at Newcastle's sewerage treatment plants could see increased levels of coastal pollution.

Twenty eight employees have walked off the job over plans to cut staffing at the plants over Christmas from two to one.

ASU Secretary Sally McManus says a solo worker at a Melbourne treatment plant died recently and was not found until a week later.

She says a refusal by members to work could have dire environmental consequences.

"Sewerage treatment plants obviously deal with outflows, they deal with environmental issues," she said.

"They're essential to the operation of everything, so this is a really bad situation that management's put everyone on in.

"We're just asking for them to keep the status quo and have two people working until we're in a position to say it's safe not to do that."

Hunter Water says it is in ongoing discussions with the union and the safety of employees and the public is their number one priority.

It has assured the public the treatment works will continue to operate effectively and safely.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Canon's CSG deal causes union problems

Canon's CSG deal causes union problems

The Australian Services Union (ASU) has taken Canon to Fair Work Australia over the transfer of technicians to the Japanese imaging giant from IT services firm CSG.

In mid-May CSG revealed it had inked a $31 million deal which would see the IT firm win the right to service about 10,500 Canon multi-function devices (a MFD is a device which integrates functions from stand-alone devices such as printers, scanners, photocopiers and fax machines).

 

Geek threat: we'll take you down

Geek threat: we'll take you down

Computer technicians are threatening chaos at fast-food outlets, supermarkets, banks and airports unless they get a pay rise.

More than 100 staff from NCR - a company responsible for repairing computer breakdowns at KFC outlets, Aldi supermarkets and Sydney Airport's baggage handling systems - are planning to to walk off the job on Monday morning.

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